I Solemnly Swear that I am up to no good

nothing is out of the limit, no boundaries, reinvention

instagram:

A Hiker’s Ever-Changing View from the Tent with @michaelmatti

For more from Michael’s adventures in the Pacific North and beyond, follow @michaelmatti on Instagram.

Even though his photography has taken him around the world, Michael Matti (@michaelmatti)’s heart—and Instagram feed—belong to beautiful landscapes near his home in Seattle.

“The amazing outdoors scene in the Pacific Northwest inspired me after college,” he says. “There is so much to see with its sea-stack-filled beaches, rugged mountains and cascading waterfalls.”

Michael frequently frames nature shots through tents, a technique he says is common among his peers. He also includes a human or animal figure against every backdrop—no matter how small they appear in the image.

“People give scale to nature,” he says. “A waterfall shot with a tiny person in the frame helps to really add a sense of wonder to the falls.”

nativeamericannews:

Video: Mysterious Deep-Sea Creature(s) Caught on Film Strike Explorers’ Awe
The depths of Mother Earth’s waters harbor no end of fascinating deep-sea creatures, most of them unseen, and many of them not even discovered.Some, like the oarfish, only come to the surface to die.

nativeamericannews:

Video: Mysterious Deep-Sea Creature(s) Caught on Film Strike Explorers’ Awe

The depths of Mother Earth’s waters harbor no end of fascinating deep-sea creatures, most of them unseen, and many of them not even discovered.
Some, like the oarfish, only come to the surface to die.

(Source: indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com)

earthstory:

Thor’s wellWhile it resembles a bottomless hole draining the sea, and known colloquially as the ‘drainpipe of the sea’, this hole in the rock is only a few metres deep. The illusion results from a dangerous tidal phenomenon, and is best seen around high tide or during a storm, when waves pound in from the Pacific ocean onto this stretch of the Oregon coast. As the waves hit the rock, they spray upwards in a huge surge known as the Spouting Horn, before crashing into the hole and draining out. Be careful while visiting, as the waves can wash you into the maelstrom, with little chance of survival. The Well is on Cape Perpetua, discovered by Captain James Cook in 1778 while seeking a route from the Pacific to the Atlantic, (the fabled Northwest Passage, that climate change may finally open up for us by melting the sea ice of the northern ocean. The area was long used by Native Americans, whose middens of empty mussel shells testify to their feasts of yesteryear.LozImage credit: Bill Younghttp://www.amazingplacesonearth.com/thors-well-usa/http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/thor-s-wellhttps://roadtrippers.com/us/or/nature/thors-well-cape-perpetua

earthstory:

Thor’s well

While it resembles a bottomless hole draining the sea, and known colloquially as the ‘drainpipe of the sea’, this hole in the rock is only a few metres deep. The illusion results from a dangerous tidal phenomenon, and is best seen around high tide or during a storm, when waves pound in from the Pacific ocean onto this stretch of the Oregon coast. As the waves hit the rock, they spray upwards in a huge surge known as the Spouting Horn, before crashing into the hole and draining out. Be careful while visiting, as the waves can wash you into the maelstrom, with little chance of survival. 

The Well is on Cape Perpetua, discovered by Captain James Cook in 1778 while seeking a route from the Pacific to the Atlantic, (the fabled Northwest Passage, that climate change may finally open up for us by melting the sea ice of the northern ocean. The area was long used by Native Americans, whose middens of empty mussel shells testify to their feasts of yesteryear.

Loz

Image credit: Bill Young
http://www.amazingplacesonearth.co
m/thors-well-usa/
http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/thor-s-well
https://roadtrippers.com/us/or/nature/thors-well-cape-perpetua

trynottodrown:

wolves-whales-and-waves:

griseus:

The marine eels and other members of the superorder  Elopomorpha have a leptocephalus larval stage, which are flat and transparent. This group is quite diverse, containing 801 species in 24 orders, 24 families and 156 genera (super diverse). 

Leptocephali have compressed bodies that contain jelly-like substances on the inside, with a thin layer of muscle with visible myomeres on the outside, a simple tube as a gut, dorsal and anal fins, but they lack pelvic fins. They also don’t have any red blood cells (most likely is respiration by passive diffusion), which they only begin produce when the change into the juvenile glass eel stage. Appears to feed on marine snow, tiny free-floating particles in the ocean.

This large size leptocephalus must be a species of Muraenidae (moray eels), and probably the larva of a long thin ribbon eel, which is metamorphosing, and is entering shallow water to finish metamorphosis into a young eel, in Bali, Indonesia.

Is it just me or does he look REALLY excited about where ever (s)he’s going?

i just looked at the face and now this post is million times better

(via ichthyologist)

theweeknddaily:

The sky’s getting cold, we’re flyin from the North. We’re rocking with our city like a sold-out show.